The Collector

  • Photo Courtesy of Constantine Moving

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector.

     

    After the initial excitement of buying a work of art has passed, it's time to start thinking about your next steps. Handing your check over is just the beginning! There are important things to take into consideration when it comes to properly caring for the work as well as getting your legal and financial ducks in a row. Thankfully, there are a bunch of experts to help you through theses processes and it's just a matter of knowing who to turn to. 

  • Art of Paper

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector.

     

    If you're a collector, the world of art fairs should be on your radar, but they may seem incredibly daunting. They have been an increasingly popular destination for collectors and art enthusiasts over the past few years, and are considered to be one of the most important outlets for dealing and socializing alike.  But with the overwhelming number of options to attend and the potentially enormous scale of the fairs themselves, how do you even begin? The art fair season will be in full swing shortly, so we've put together a primer for the first-time attendee.

  • Julian Jackson, "Muse 1"

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector.

     

    We've talked a lot about what to do once you've decided to become an art collector, but what if you've suddenly become a collector not quite by choice? Maybe one day you get a call: Aunt Linda has died and left you with her beloved painting, or a whole house full of art. What next? 

  • An Auction at Sotheby's, Photo Courtesy of Art Market Talks

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector.

     

    The art auction is one of the most alluring parts of collecting art for many people. Simultaneously the most visible market (with its splashy headlines and glamorous guestlists) and the most mysterious (with its secretive bidders and sellers and its behind-the-scenes whispering), the world of auctions can seem inscrutable. There's language to be decoded and research to be done and gossip to be sifted through. (If you've been following the news in the art world lately, you'll know that there are some very juicy things happening in the auction houses of New York.) But once you're in the know, bidding at an auction can be a fun, exciting, and satisfying way to collect art. (Or you may think it's frustrating, vapid, and a rip-off. But that's for you to decide!)

  • Detail of "Purple Lake 12" by Susan Hambleton

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector. 

     

    There can be a misconception that prints are not as prized as paintings or works on paper, but collecting prints certainly has its own joy. Of course, there are many different kinds of prints, and it's important to be able to distinguish those that are of genuinely good value rather than just a mechanical reproduction of an original work. But, a good, artistically viable print can be seen as an extension of their entire artistic vision.  More and more often, respected artists are making prints because they see them as an integral part of their work. Also, a print very often has a substantially lower price than its counterparts on canvas. If you're interested in prints, here's a guide on how to get started. 

  • What is Art Worth?

    Let's Talk Dollars and Cents
    Detail of "Wishful Thinking" by Suzanne Laura Kammin

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector. 

     

    Last week, we talked about art as an investment and (spoiler alert) concluded that it wasn't best to think of collecting art as an investment alone. First and foremost, you should buy what you love. But, it is important to consider the work's value. So, how do you know what a piece of art's worth? Figuring that out is one of the trickiest parts of buying art, even for total veterans of the art world. This week, we'll take a look at some basic concepts and rules for how art is priced and how to ensure you're getting a good deal. 

  • Duchamp's Urinal

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector. 

     

    If you're getting into the art collecting game with dollar signs in your eyes, you should probably take a seat and read this first.  We hate to break it to you, but art is a crummy investment.  Call us sentimental, but our number one rule when it comes to buying art is to buy what you love. Buy what speaks to your soul and what you can't imagine living without being lucky enough to look at it every day.  If you're lured in by news of those million dollar sales, it's very likely you'll be disappointed. For one, the vast majority of artwork never goes up in value. Most art declines in value by 50% the minute you walk out of the gallery.  It's also not liquid. Typically, a dealer who sold you a piece of art will not buy it back later. They have new work to sell by the artist that they can get on consignment, and so they don't want to deal with older works that they have to pay for.

     

    Also, determining the value of art is one of the trickiest parts of the art world and market.  Just like any other market, the art market fluctuates over time, and predicting the rise and fall of any one piece's value is near impossible and, for the most part, essentially based on luck. Art is a subjective medium, and a lot of what goes into buying it is purely based on emotions. It's futile to attempt to quantify those transactions rooted in something so intangible.  How do you turn taste and public opinion into a formula?

  • Meredith Pardue's Work in Its Home

    Every week, we'll be your guide as you navigate the world of buying art in our series, The Collector. 

     

    If you're an intelligent, affluent, sophisticated consumer just starting to dip your toes into the world of art, the contemporary art market can seem overwhelming and intimidating. How do you know what you like? Where do you find it? Is the value good? Don't succumb to being so cautious that you adorn your exquisitely decorated home with your college posters and impulse buys you find in souvenir shops on vacation. Take some time to learn about art, what you like, and what you're looking for before you dive in. Here are the three first steps to take for buying original art: